Game Art Production

Who are our experts? We’ll tell you by the secret: those are all i​mmerse players in the field of software development who provide luxurious game animation services. iLogos offers a talented handpicked team of artists and animators. Our experts seamlessly collaborate with you to provide game art design services and deliver top-notch solutions at every stage of the production pipeline. Be sure that with us by your side you will achieve your creative vision in the shortest period.
Our ART PRODUCTION clients
  • Wooga
  • Gram Games
  • Electronic Arts
  • Playrix

Art Styles & Genres

Styles we are passionatelly proactive, creative and proficient
  • Cartoon
  • Stylized
  • Realistic

Cartoon

  • Fantasy cartoon
  • Sci-fi cartoon
  • Military cartoon
  • Puzzle game cartoon
  • Card game cartoon
  • Strategy cartoon
  • Adventure cartoon
  • Arcade cartoon
  • Hidden object games cartoon
Explore more Cartoon Examples
in Our Portfolio

Stylized

  • Strategy stylized
  • Fantasy stylized
  • Card game stylized
  • Military stylized
  • Role playing game stylized
Explore more Stylized Examples
in Our Portfolio

Realistic

  • Realistic 3D weapons
  • Strategy games realistic
  • Role playing game realistic
Explore more Realistic Examples
in Our Portfolio

Art Disciplines

2D art
Сoncept art

Umbrella term for the visual representations of the game content ideas, that is created as a first step of creating the game art.

Concept art can be divided into the following subgroups:

  • Character design
  • Object design (any types of physical objects present in the game)
  • Environment design
Illustrations

A visual representation based on the pre-defined subject and art style in which the subject is more important than the form

Game Art

Creating of an artistic asset of a video game that will be ready to get incorporated into the game engine right after creation. It can be both 2 and 3-dimensional, so it can belong to both 2D and 3D art disciplines.

2D Animation
Character or non-character animation

Related or not related to the characters. Non-character animation can be related to environment animation, object animation, ambient animation etc.

Frame-By-Frame Animation

A technique that creates the illusion of movement by making incremental changes between every keyframe

Cut-Out (Procedure-Based) Animation

A type of animation used to automatically generate animation in real-time to allow for a more diverse series of actions than could otherwise be created using predefined animations.

3D art
Sculpting

Creation of the 3-dimensional sculptures with unlimited number of polygons by means of software tools to push, pull, smooth, grab, pinch or otherwise manipulate a digital object as if it were made of a real-life substance such as clay.

Illustrations

HiPoly – polygon mesh that uses polygons to determine the surface detail of the object, where the number of polygons can reach a few millions.

LowPoly – polygon mesh that has a relatively small number of polygons (commonly believed as below 30-50K)

Texturing

Applying an image of a texture to a plain 3D model. Textures are the flat images that are applied to a model to give it colour, detail, and a certain feel to the surface. We are able to perform 2 types of texturing:

  • Handpaint – painting the material from scratch
  • PBR – with the usage of certain preset materials surface or procedural maps
Skinning

Applying some parts of the surfaces to the existing base model – as one of the examples, it can work as adding vortex to the skeleton bones

Rigging

The process of setting up the technical structure for animating the model. For example, if we are speaking of skeleton, it includes linking the bones in a hierarchy, setting constraints on the bones’ movement, and setting up controls (which are aids for the animator). This discipline is used not only for the animation, for also for posing.

3D Animation
Matte Painting

A technique that combines art and live action to create the illusion of a setting that would otherwise be too expensive, inconvenient, or impossible to film live. This is a mix of 2D and 3D technologies when we apply the combination of realistic 3D techniques (for instance light) and then painting the asset in 2D.

As a deliverable of matte painting technique we get a classical game art item or illustration, but the method of its creation is not classical.

VFX - Visual Effects

These effects can be both 2D and 3D and can be used in any styles of the games. The most common VFX types are fire, water, dust, smoke etc.

As oner of the examples, these effects that can be used for creating realistic environments. In this is an integration between actual footage and this manipulated imagery to create realistic looking environments for the context. An example of VFX would be the dragons flying through the sky in Game of Thrones, or a spaceship flying through space in Star Wars.

Compositing

Combining of visual elements from separate sources into single images, often to create the illusion that all those elements are parts of the same scene. Compositing artists are responsible for helping create the final finished animation by detecting errors and developing compositing strategies, which results in an overall balanced look.

Promotional Art

Creating the art items (any static or dynamic materials) that have an aim of promoting a game product to the certain audience. Most common is type of promotional art is a trailer – 30-60 sec promo video that demonstrates the core components of the gameplay and has an aim of promoting the game to its future users

Art Production Process

Certain projects may not require each of the stages below.

The necessity of each stage is always discussed at the “first touches” – calls and e-mails.

  • Understanding ideas and goals behind the project
  • Setting up the benchmarks and defining art style
  • Gathering materials and references
  • Setting up an art production roadmap
  • Working on drafts
  • Creating the key art
  • Refining and polishing the result
  • Analyzing style and art production improvements.
Understanding ideas and goals behind the project
Setting up the benchmarks and defining art style
Gathering materials and references
Setting up an art production roadmap
Working on drafts
Creating the key art
Refining and polishing the result
Analyzing style and art production improvements.
Step 1. Understanding ideas and goals behind the project

The art director and the art team gather up and study all project information that’s required to establish creative goals and ways to reach them.

Time to Deliver
~1 week
Step 2. Setting up the benchmarks and defining art style

The art team defines visual targets, finds workflows to get them done and skills required to do so, and creates art guidelines.

Time to Deliver
1-4 weeks
Step 3. Gathering materials and references

The art director and art team gather art materials and references that will help to find bolder, more authentic art styles, find strong concepts, and proper art direction.

Time to Deliver
3-4 days
Step 4. Setting up an art production roadmap

The art director and the art team assemble the production plan and define the team roles and responsibilities for your game art project.

Time to Deliver
2-3 days
Step 5. Working on drafts

The art team works on a series of drafts that explore a selected art style to get key art to look and feel aligned to initial concepts.

Time to Deliver
2-4 days
Step 6. Creating the key art

The art team creates original art according to defined concepts and by the established workflow—as The Direction intended.

Time to Deliver
1-2 weeks
Step 7. Refining and polishing the result

The art team refines art they’ve created and cross-edits to check for weak spots and remove them.

Time to Deliver
3-5 days
Step 8. Analyzing style and art production improvements.

The art team makes a retrospective: sits back, looks for loopholes in the production steps, finds where the elements of the game art design services could have been better—and elevates the results from there.

Time to Deliver
5-6 days
Step 1. Understanding ideas and goals behind the project

The art director and the art team gather up and study all project information that’s required to establish creative goals and ways to reach them.

Time to Deliver
~1 week
Step 2. Setting up the benchmarks and defining art style

The art team defines visual targets, finds workflows to get them done and skills required to do so, and creates art guidelines.

Time to Deliver
1-4 weeks
Step 3. Gathering materials and references

The art director and art team gather art materials and references that will help to find bolder, more authentic art styles, find strong concepts, and proper art direction.

Time to Deliver
3-4 days
Step 4. Setting up an art production roadmap

The art director and the art team assemble the production plan and define the team roles and responsibilities for your game art project.

Time to Deliver
2-3 days
Step 5. Working on drafts

The art team works on a series of drafts that explore a selected art style to get key art to look and feel aligned to initial concepts.

Time to Deliver
2-4 days
Step 6. Creating the key art

The art team creates original art according to defined concepts and by the established workflow—as The Direction intended.

Time to Deliver
1-2 weeks
Step 7. Refining and polishing the result

The art team refines art they’ve created and cross-edits to check for weak spots and remove them.

Time to Deliver
3-5 days
Step 8. Analyzing style and art production improvements.

The art team makes a retrospective: sits back, looks for loopholes in the production steps, finds where the elements of the game art design services could have been better—and elevates the results from there.

Time to Deliver
5-6 days

Our Creative Leads

People you’ll be working with
Alexey Yurchenko
Head of Art
Alexandra Kosenko
Art Director
Anastasiya Chorna
Art Director
Vasili Tkach
Art Director

Why Outsource Art Production?

Produce more creative art content
Our team of professionals can make your product stand out from other games, no matter what genre you choose. We can even come up with a fully new genre for your project so that it will impress your audience for sure.
Speed up art creation
Do you have burning deadlines? We understand that you might lack time and other resources to accomplish the project on time, and we are ready to speed up the process thanks to our great expertise.
Boost creativity of your team
Is your team running out of creative ideas? iLogos has worked with plenty of projects of different genres, so we are ready to share our experience, ensuring that your product is the best on the market.
Gain niche expertise
We only deal with game developers with impressive skills and experience. iLogos always check their portfolios before hiring. Our team consists of gaming gurus who used to work with basically every direction out there.

Schedule a call with our team right now

Frequently Asked Questions

Which styles do you have expertise with at iLogos?

Key styles are:

  • Cartoon (2d/3d)
  • Stylised (something medium between cartoons and realism) (2d/3d)
  • Realism (2d/3d)

But as a game art services company, we have contacts of people who can work in other styles—prompt us for details with what you have in mind for your game. As we build games for different platforms, we create art for different platforms as well—so if you need mobile game art outsourcing, we’re here for you, too.

Which genres do you have expertise with at iLogos?

Our main expertise is creating art for casual games (match-3, board games, word games) and mid-core games (strategies, fighting games, platformers, card games) — but we’re open to new experiences.

Can you provide animation services?

Sure, we have animators — they’ve animated in 2D and 3D games.

Can you outsource game 2D and 3D art?

Yes, we have art teams that do:

  • Concept arts,
  • 2D game art outsourcing,
  • 3D game art outsourcing,
  • UI design for your game (extremely important on mobile and consoles like Nintendo Switch),
  • AAA art.
Do you have concept artists?

Of course, since we are a full-cycle company, we work a lot on the development of games from scratch — game art services for them often include art style and concept art development.

How much content can my team produce per month?

It depends on how many art pieces/art-related content in general you want for the game. We can assemble you a team of two or five if your project is small — and we can gather 35+ specialists (if you plan on releasing in multiple locations, for instance, or if you plan a huge DLC).

Which cooperation models can you offer if I plan on outsourcing game art production? How is game art outsourcing price constructed?

Which cooperation models can you offer if I plan on outsourcing game art production? How is game art outsourcing price constructed?

The best option is to work through a dedicated team model. Within it, you’ll get a team that will work on all aspects of your art production, always (or as far as it’s established in the contract). They’ll get used to your style, storytelling, learn your players and the quality and velocity of their work will grow month by month. This approach is super flexible in terms of price: with an hourly rate established, you don’t need to negotiate or sign extra papers to add, remove, or rework something in the project.

The other option is working with a team by a fixed-price model, milestone by milestone. Instead of working through the project as it develops, we’ll determine the scope of work to do on each stage of the art production. You’ll pay for deliverables outlined within each stage, and we’ll work within deadlines, established for these stages. In this case, if you want to change or add something, we’ll negotiate a change order.

Can you work with our pipeline?

Yes, we have worked as LiveOps with lots of games — often as an extension of a core team; we know how to adapt to different companies’ production pace and style.

Can you suggest a game art production pipeline for us?

Of course! We enjoy building processes that work for people and for the game they’re developing—and we’ll happily do that for you, applying Secret Knowledge (™) of 15 years in gamedev. (Secret knowledge being lots of trials, failures, and learning).

Can you build an art style?

Yes, and we’ll enjoy this immensely — that’s one of our most favorite parts of working with gamedev companies who are outsourcing game art services. Our Art Leads and a team of concept artists (sometimes, it’s a team of one) will prepare an Art Bible describing the new art style so you could use it with other teams if you wish.

Can you create an Art Bible?

Yes. All we need from you is a detailed game description and art references for your ideas.

Can you make our test assignment?

Of course. We think that the test assignment is as important for us as it is for you. It’s a chance to prove our skills and get to know how you work and communicate within the production process; it’s also an opportunity to understand your expectations — or at least get a preliminary idea of them: sometimes, based on these, we’ll rearrange some people on the team, assess the project timeline differently, etc. after the test assignment.

How do I make sure the art team has enough skills to cope with our game?

We make sure your team will be a good fit both in terms of hard skills and in terms of personal involvement—we’ll never put the person who hates shooters in charge of your action-driven explosive title.

But that’s just words — there are several options for us to confirm we’re as good as we say: give us a test assignment; ask people we’ve worked with before — f.i., studios mentioned in our portfolio.

Speak with Our Experts

We help you hit your goals faster thanks to our great expertise.

If you prefer to contact us, use this email: bizdev@ilogos.biz

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