3D Art Studio

iLogos is an award-winning game development company that turns into a 3D art studio when the occasion – our clients – call for that. We’ve worked in the game industry — and drawn, modeled, and animated 3D art for the projects within it — for about 15 years. We collaborated on art projects with small studios and giants of the industry; helped young indies to reach their publishers and crafted graphics for major IP-based projects.

Every detail of our art is thought through and crafted to convey elements of the story. Enhance the player’s experience and enjoyment of the game. iLogos art team will draw a 3D world for your game — and your players will love to get lost & found exploring it.

Our ART PRODUCTION clients

3D Art Services

Every detail of our art is thought through and crafted to convey elements of the story. Enhance the player’s experience and enjoyment of the game. iLogos art team will draw a 3D world for your game — and your players will love to get lost & found exploring it.
3D Character Design
3D Environment Design
3D Vehicle Design
3D Hard Surface Design
3D Game Modeling
Low Poly 3D Modeling
3D Character Design
Many regard characters as the most important element of games: they’re the player’s avatars, their guides through the story and its conduits. We love creating character art – in particular, in 3D art, – and work in different styles, genres, and across different levels of detail when we do it. We design art for 3D characters from concept art to rendering and animation. With IP-based projects, iLogos replicated the characters from the original media, ensuring their facial expressions, gestures, and mannerisms, the color scheme of their clothes, and other visual nuances make an identical fit to the original.
3D Environment Design
Any game must have time and space it’s happening within, and environment design often covers both. iLogos art design team crafts the digital “home” for your story, all aspects of it: we design art for locations within nature (mountains, riverbeds, deserts) and human-made environments (cities, interplanetary outposts, villages). We craft art for the environment on macro- and micro-levels, from small art on Wanted posters to large-scale background pieces. iLogos also makes sure that, when integrated into the game, various environment-related art assets become efficient tools for level design; improve the game’s readability; engage players and guide them.
3D Vehicle Design
Vehicles are often indicators of genre and mood in a game (if it’s not a vehicle-focused game, like NFS): and to craft them, our artists: a) study the references and games in a similar genre a lot, b) design dozens of sketches to settle on a perfect look for in-game vehicles. From motorcycles to boats, from fighter jets to large space shuttles, from bikes and Victorian-style cabs to skyships. We craft beautiful and functional – or non-functional, if your narrative demands it – vehicles for your game, and make sure to design gameplay and UI to fit their customized controls.
3D Hard Surface Design
Elements of hard surface design are present in almost all of the services above (except character art production). The field covers art for high-tech weapons, huge humanoid mechas, industrial machines – and more mundane things, like furniture. While crafting art for intricately detailed and complex pieces of machinery, we work hard on designing the right sort of material/rendering them for every surface. Create constructs that are functional in the world they’re about to be integrated into. Our work draws inspiration from real-life objects, but also from conventions of sci-fi and fantasy in different media, from, e.g.m movies to comics to anime (if it fits the game’s style, of course).
3D Game Modeling
Our first service covers game 3D modeling as an umbrella concept. We do all kinds of it: box and polygon modeling and 3D sculpting for character models, photogrammetry for more detailed environmental art, simulation modeling and texturing for replicating physical features and effects for various in-game objects, and more. Often, the art assets we prepare for clients’ games combine different modeling types: we mix them to achieve attractive and bright game aesthetics, stylized or realistic, that players will enjoy.
Low Poly 3D Modeling
Crafting 3D graphics based on low poly 3D models (LPM) is one of our most frequently requested services. We do have clients who want high-poly modeling only and we often blend high- and a low number of polygons in various models’ meshes to add more details to, for instance, character designs, but: LPM is a more affordable and quicker option. Studios that want to develop games for mobile and young game companies that want to cut time-to-market and save their resources go for this option. 3D artwork here is still sophisticated, and low-poly games can be and are extremely popular.

Our Technology Experiance in 3D Art

To create 3D art (and animation) for these services, we use an array of software: Blender, 3DS Max, Modo, ZBrush; Marvelous Designer, Substance Designer & Substance Painter; 3DCoat, Adobe Photoshop, Marmoset Toolbag, V-Ray, Corona; Unreal Engine and Unity.

That may seem like an extensive list, but for particular projects, we tend to pick programs that are a) will allow us to achieve splendid results with a minimum hustle and maximum cost-saving for our partners, b) familiar and loved by members of the team who have started to work on the project. If you have other tech suites in mind, though, we’ll gladly adopt them: in fact, we have a well-developed knowledge transfer process to do so efficiently and quickly.

3D Art Production Process

Below, we’ll outline stages of how we prefer integrating the art production process into game development, but if you use a different approach – we’re up to teaching ourselves how to work within it. Same for the cases if you want a particular stage of 3D art production done: for instance, you already have the concepts and want to have those 3D assets animated & ready for integration.
  • Contextualizing
  • Gathering references & finalizing art style
  • Creating a project roadmap
  • Creating 3D art
  • Release & feedback gathering
  • LiveOps & updating content
Contextualizing
Gathering references & finalizing art style
Creating a project roadmap
Creating 3D art
Release & feedback gathering
LiveOps & updating content
Step 1. Contextualizing

You come to us, and we talk about the game’s idea, the core gameplay, and what needs to be done in terms of 3D artwork. We figure out what you already have and what you don’t have, and set up an outline of things to know before we’ll be able to estimate timelines & budget (if you don’t already have one of those.)

Step 2. Gathering references & finalizing art style

At this stage, we’re finding what style will suit your world, story, and core mechanics the best: 3D styles aren’t uniform. We conceptualize authentic and relevant aesthetics for whatever art types you’ll need (or, present several samples & sketches of what this aesthetics might look like), – and we finalize it with you. This stage helps to make clear how we need to draw, in addition to what and how much time we have – for instance, we decide what type of modeling (low-polygon or high-polygon or another type) is the best option for your game.

Step 3. Creating a project roadmap

To create a 3D art asset for, e.g., your character, we’ll need to craft a concept art of it, model it (this includes sculpting, texturing, setting specific rendering style, and other processes that depend on the type of modeling), rig and skin it, animate it and make sure it slots into the game engine in a perfect assembly with your gameplay & other game art if you have any. Every art asset we’ll draw will need such a process.

To manage this multi-level pipeline (because some art assets you’ll require are delivered earlier than others), we’ll split our work into short cycles, with meetings dedicated to your feedback on the ready pieces; time dedicated to editing/tuning up the work of technical artists/etc. At the end of this stage, you’ll receive a calendar with those production cycles – a roadmap – and the members of our art team will get it, too. Before moving on to the next stage, we’ll finalize the budget & timeline for production, too.

Step 4. Creating 3D art

Artists get to work: they create concept art, model, texture, rig, skin, and animate within established style guidelines. Their work is recurrently sent to you and moved to technical artists to prepare for smooth integration into the game after you’ve greenlighted them.

Step 5. Release & feedback gathering

Your audience holds vital insight into your game and our art assets, in particular. We listen to what they say (e.g., if environmental artists, technical artists, and game designers did a good job of making the game readable) and address the issues we can within our art department (edit/polish art, tune in lightning, work with contrast, etc.) That stage might happen within limited early access release, MVP release, or full-blown release, – whenever you want to gather feedback. If we’re handling the entire game development of your project, we prefer having it within a vertical slice/early access release.

Step 6. LiveOps & updating content

If your game is built for regular updates to attract new audiences or if you’re planning a sequel/DLC release, we’re here to help you produce more 3D art for these occasions.

Step 1. Contextualizing

You come to us, and we talk about the game’s idea, the core gameplay, and what needs to be done in terms of 3D artwork. We figure out what you already have and what you don’t have, and set up an outline of things to know before we’ll be able to estimate timelines & budget (if you don’t already have one of those.)

Step 2. Gathering references & finalizing art style

At this stage, we’re finding what style will suit your world, story, and core mechanics the best: 3D styles aren’t uniform. We conceptualize authentic and relevant aesthetics for whatever art types you’ll need (or, present several samples & sketches of what this aesthetics might look like), – and we finalize it with you. This stage helps to make clear how we need to draw, in addition to what and how much time we have – for instance, we decide what type of modeling (low-polygon or high-polygon or another type) is the best option for your game.

Step 3. Creating a project roadmap

To create a 3D art asset for, e.g., your character, we’ll need to craft a concept art of it, model it (this includes sculpting, texturing, setting specific rendering style, and other processes that depend on the type of modeling), rig and skin it, animate it and make sure it slots into the game engine in a perfect assembly with your gameplay & other game art if you have any. Every art asset we’ll draw will need such a process.

To manage this multi-level pipeline (because some art assets you’ll require are delivered earlier than others), we’ll split our work into short cycles, with meetings dedicated to your feedback on the ready pieces; time dedicated to editing/tuning up the work of technical artists/etc. At the end of this stage, you’ll receive a calendar with those production cycles – a roadmap – and the members of our art team will get it, too. Before moving on to the next stage, we’ll finalize the budget & timeline for production, too.

Step 4. Creating 3D art

Artists get to work: they create concept art, model, texture, rig, skin, and animate within established style guidelines. Their work is recurrently sent to you and moved to technical artists to prepare for smooth integration into the game after you’ve greenlighted them.

Step 5. Release & feedback gathering

Your audience holds vital insight into your game and our art assets, in particular. We listen to what they say (e.g., if environmental artists, technical artists, and game designers did a good job of making the game readable) and address the issues we can within our art department (edit/polish art, tune in lightning, work with contrast, etc.) That stage might happen within limited early access release, MVP release, or full-blown release, – whenever you want to gather feedback. If we’re handling the entire game development of your project, we prefer having it within a vertical slice/early access release.

Step 6. LiveOps & updating content

If your game is built for regular updates to attract new audiences or if you’re planning a sequel/DLC release, we’re here to help you produce more 3D art for these occasions.

iLogos 3D Art Team

Now that we’ve talked about the process of 3D art production, let’s talk about the roles of people who are going to become the beating heart of your game.
Head of art
Does quality control & performance reviews for an entire department. An experienced 3D artist and a great people person, they know from the team will fit right into your project (and for whom, your project would become a passion.)
3D Art Director
Connects the narrative and gameplay to the visual language of the game and develops distinct ideas on how to talk through art most efficiently. Helps develop and maintain the dominant aesthetics & art style. An experienced artist and storyteller. A link between you and the team.
Lead 3D Artist
A senior 3D artist who curates each sprint of production from the angle of people’s productivity & efficiency. Sustains Art Director’s vision within the process. Keeps everyone to the game design document (GDD). Mentors junior artists & those new to the genre/style.
Head of art
Does quality control & performance reviews for an entire department. An experienced 3D artist and a great people person, they know from the team will fit right into your project (and for whom, your project would become a passion.)
Head of art
Does quality control & performance reviews for an entire department. An experienced 3D artist and a great people person, they know from the team will fit right into your project (and for whom, your project would become a passion.)
3D Art Director
Connects the narrative and gameplay to the visual language of the game and develops distinct ideas on how to talk through art most efficiently. Helps develop and maintain the dominant aesthetics & art style. An experienced artist and storyteller. A link between you and the team.
Lead 3D Artist
A senior 3D artist who curates each sprint of production from the angle of people’s productivity & efficiency. Sustains Art Director’s vision within the process. Keeps everyone to the game design document (GDD). Mentors junior artists & those new to the genre/style.
Head of art
Does quality control & performance reviews for an entire department. An experienced 3D artist and a great people person, they know from the team will fit right into your project (and for whom, your project would become a passion.)

Why Outsource
3D Game Art Services with iLogos?

Expand your team, fast
The main reason people go for game art outsourcing is the lack of talent, a burden of our age. iLogos have collaborated with major studios like Sony, EA, and Ubisoft on 3D art projects. We’re glad to tell you: we have no shortage of awesome artists – and your game is waiting for them.
Get your game released ahead of time
Game art outsourcing is also popular with the right tech partner because it saves time. 3D art production is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. Setting it up from scratch makes it even more so. At iLogos, we’ll assemble a team of artists to craft 3D visuals for your game in about 2-4 weeks, then we adopt your tempo & fit into your dev process – and get to work. You do no hiring, onboarding, or managing (unless you want to.)
Receive ideas from the award-winning studio
New to game development and not sure if something looked the way you want your game to look? Unsure how to add an interesting twist to the art style? Have cool mechanics in mind, but no ideas for the visual part of the game? “Yes” to these and other questions prompt our clients to collaborate on art production with us. We help you resolve all that with our experience & creativity.
Produce more great content
Studios that release games that need updates often hire us to take care of them – and we enjoy crafting new art assets for their updates & patches. They, in the meantime, can focus on getting new ideas on paper and new projects – underway.
Expand your team, fast
The main reason people go for game art outsourcing is the lack of talent, a burden of our age. iLogos have collaborated with major studios like Sony, EA, and Ubisoft on 3D art projects. We’re glad to tell you: we have no shortage of awesome artists – and your game is waiting for them.
Get your game released ahead of time
Game art outsourcing is also popular with the right tech partner because it saves time. 3D art production is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. Setting it up from scratch makes it even more so. At iLogos, we’ll assemble a team of artists to craft 3D visuals for your game in about 2-4 weeks, then we adopt your tempo & fit into your dev process – and get to work. You do no hiring, onboarding, or managing (unless you want to.)
Receive ideas from the award-winning studio
New to game development and not sure if something looked the way you want your game to look? Unsure how to add an interesting twist to the art style? Have cool mechanics in mind, but no ideas for the visual part of the game? “Yes” to these and other questions prompt our clients to collaborate on art production with us. We help you resolve all that with our experience & creativity.
Produce more great content
Studios that release games that need updates often hire us to take care of them – and we enjoy crafting new art assets for their updates & patches. They, in the meantime, can focus on getting new ideas on paper and new projects – underway.

Schedule a call with our team right now

Frequently Asked Questions

What is 3D Art?

3D or three-dimensional art is the art that has height, width, and depth, and it’s considered more realistic than 3D art.

How To Hire a 3D Artist?

On freelance platforms or job boards, on websites like ArtStation and Patreon, on Twitter and LinkedIn, via referrals, and via googling for an art studio.

There are a lot of ways, some are more reliable (referrals) than others (Twitter), and some are more time-consuming (posting on LinkedIn and hiring in-house) than others (getting a partnership or a freelance contract.)

The rules of thumb in any of these cases are: look for their portfolio and works in your genre/niche; ask their previous clients about collaboration; (if you have time) ask them to do an art test.

How Is 3D Art for Games Made?

First, an art design studio develops concept art. Then 3D artists with various specializations craft 3D models (via sculpting, unwrapping/backing, texturing, etc), rig and skin those models, animate them and send them to tech artists for rendering/tuning for the game engine.

How Long Does It Take to Make the First Sketch?

It depends. Sketches for graphics for match-three puzzles can be completed within a week or two. Sketches for large-scale open-world games will take longer, especially if we’re talking character & environment art. For these sketches to then be upgraded into art assets, the art department will need narrative designers, game designers, art directors, and artists themselves to collaborate. Deciding on the look & animation of the character may (and does, in AAA+ games) take months.

Speak with Our Experts

We help you hit your goals faster thanks to our great expertise.

If you prefer to contact us, use this email: bizdev@ilogos.biz

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